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Posts Tagged ‘lawsuit’

DeKalb redistricting faces lawsuit, but…

March 8, 2011 5 comments

The AJC reported today that a lawsuit was filed in DeKalb Superior Court to stop the planned redistricting of DeKalb schools. Well that lawsuit itself is questionable(see images here and here). It seems John Evans of the DeKalb NAACP says that he did not sign on to the suit, nor did he give permission for others to use his name on the lawsuit. According to the AJC, five parents filed the complaint along with Evans. Looking at the suit, it seems that Latasha Walker is the lead plaintiff as well as several others including Evans. When I spoke with Evans, he said that he was not a willing or active participant in the suit, and has asked those who filed the suit to remove hos name by the end of the day or he will take legal action. He said he would not discuss any of the details of the redistricting or whether he supports the lawsuit until his name is removed. I did talk with a staffer at the DeKalb NAACP offices, and he too was surprised that Mr. Evans was a party in the suit. The question I have is how can someone just add you to a lawsuit without your consent or knowledge? I think someone has a lot of explaining to do.

Here is a copy of the complaint filed yesterday. A quick read of the document, and the first thing out of my head was that this was not filed by an attorney. Usually at the bottom, you will see the filing attorneys information. Also The AJC reported that one petitioner, Annette Davis Jackson, moved out of DeKalb to Gwinnett because her kids were kicked out of school. The complaint states that Ms. Jackson is a resident of DeKalb. I do not know if that is sworn testimony, but if it is then she has some explaining to do also.

Vernon Jones loses case and maybe more

April 1, 2010 4 comments

Vernon Jones loses DeKalb discrimination suit  | ajc.com.

Damn Vernon. You discriminatin’ against white people. That’s what a jury said. Vernon, and his co-defendants were found liable for creating a “racially hostile work environment”. let me say this, anytime you have more than one black man in a work environment, it is considered hostile. Two of the plaintiffs were not awarded any damages. This has to be terrible news for Jones. He is running for Congress in a district that has a sizable white population. If they see him as hostile towards whites, this could be the end of his run for Congress. Hell it could be the end of his run for any office outside of the ‘hood. I personally want to see Vernon run a strong campaign, and I hope he can deflect criticism about this verdict and keep the focus on why he should be the Congressman from the 4th. After all, if there is no Vernon this race will be really boring.

Reverse discrimination suit not good for Jones

March 24, 2010 Comments off

Vernon Jones testified today in a reverse discrimination lawsuit filed against the him and other county employees in 2004. Jones, who is running for the 4th district congressional seat, is already a polarizing figure, but this is not what you want to be doing when you are trying to get a congressional campaign up and running. According to the AJC, there is a voice recording that implies Jones would not be happy with some possible promotions in the fire department. Here is a quote form the AJC article:

“He wants to pick ‘em from a population that is solid snow white already,” Stone said. “Now he got to cut that [expletive] out with Vernon. … He told David Foster not to — we don’t promote anybody until you figure out how you can fix this problem.”

The CEO, Stone said, would be furious. “Vernon’s going to kill ‘em.”

This is no smoking gun, but my gut tells me the county could be on the hook for this one (I would love to see the entire jury on this one). Whether the case has merit or not, is not for me to decide, but I wonder how much of this is about the former CEO and how much is about actual job discrimination. If you read this article from the AJC, Jones hired whites for several high positions in county government. In the article, if it is true, one of the plaintiffs was even promoted, given a raise and a car allowance. Hell, I would take that kind of discrimination all day long. Seriously though, I think the lawyer for the county employees being sued alongside Jones said it perfectly

“Our Constitution is not designed to be a workplace be nice code,” he said. “It is designed to protect against discrimination.”

Basically, Vernon may not treat you nice, but don’t worry he treats everyone like that.

Read the full AJC Article

DeKalb schools hit with civil rights complaint

March 6, 2010 Comments off

Civil rights complaint filed against DeKalb schools  | ajc.com.

According to this AJC article, the complaint charges that race plays a role in who gets into DeKalb’s high achievers program called the International Baccalaureate. After a little research into the group, known as In My Shoes, who is filing the complaint on behalf of student x, I was able to better make sense of their argument. At first I was skeptical of the race complaint, now not so. I believe this may be a class issue where race happens to be the one factor that’s binds it all together. According to the group, they think educational access in South DeKalb lags that of North DeKalb schools. That is something many of us in South DeKalb have known for quite sometime. From the outside looking in it would seem that the academic success in South DeKalb is limited, after all no high school in South DeKalb has SAT scores that  are above the Georgia average, and few if any middle and primary schools rank high on any criterion based test. This is sort of like a chicken and the egg scenario. Are the bad tests and grades a result of a lack of a quality education, or is the education of a high quality and the kids just don’t get it. It is easy to write off these kids and say they are not able to do the work, but if they are being taught to a level that is not competitive or challenging, then can we really expect them to excel at the next level.  do not know how this is going to fall, but I hope it sheds light on practices that keep challenging educational programs out of “urban” schools in favor of their more suburban counterparts.